Productivity

9 Productivity Frameworks And Tools For Effective Management

Over 50,000 US users search for “productivity” in Google every single month.

When you add the long list of queries around productivity tips, productivity apps, productivity planners and other forms of definitions around the term, we’re ranking over 300,000 total searches across the board.

We are all eager to fight procrastination and maximize our time. Best-case scenario, deliver more in less time, reduce the tedious backlog at the end of the day, and get better at everything we do: professionally and personally.

Productivity Trends

But here’s a fun fact for you.

Productivity has always been a chore. The humankind has been dealing with maximizing efficiency while increasing impact for centuries.

We can validate this hypothesis by looking into Google Trends. But there’s something else that’s even more intriguing in this 5-year chart of users looking up productivity online:

productivity search trends since 2014

The percentage of users interested in productivity hasn’t decreased or increased drastically over the past 5 years. But have you noticed these drops in searches that Google has conveniently remarked here?

The lowest 5 drops are all clocked between Dec 20 and Dec 26. Christmas and Hanukkah inevitably shift our focus to family, combined with the holidays at the end of the calendar year.

And apart from this gap, there are certain months where productivity searches are way off!

Summertime, of course. June and July mark the lowest interest in productivity around the year (with the exception of Christmas). There’s a notable decrease starting late in May and growing back early in August.

Productivity matters the most when school and work are back on track and students and employees together hunt for the Holy Grail in productivity. Acing that class or earning this Q4 bonus are strong motivating factors for getting the most out of your life — and here’s what we will cover in this productivity guide.

productivity frameworks and tools for effective management

This is a compilation of my own strategies, tools that I use to perform at my best, and techniques I’ve learned from industry leaders and productivity trainers over the past 15 years.

1. Your Energy Is The Most Important Asset

Do you know what makes entrepreneurs so effective at what they do?

No, it’s not just clocking 80-hour workweeks.

Entrepreneurs have the luxury to juggle with dozens of activities on a daily basis. While multitasking is known to hurt productivity, switching between different action items is a healthy exercise for your brain.

Spending 8 hours on preparing a complex spreadsheet is tiresome. But hopping between a strategy meeting and a sales call after reviewing the financial forecast and before you coordinate the product roadmap leads to an effective workflow that fully removes procrastination as an obstacle.

Diverse activities, scheduled appointments, tough deadlines are inevitably squeezing efficiency out of a leader.

More importantly, it’s an external factor that contributes to maintaining energy levels.

Energy is your biggest asset by far. If you are more productive in the morning, make the most out of this time. Arrive early at the office or prepare some tasks ahead of time while sipping your coffee. Night owls can arrange their agenda before wrapping up for the night and schedule all energy-intensive activities late in the evening.

Instead of looking for another hour to spare and catch up, carefully monitor and maintain your energy for maximum efficiency. Keep in mind that eating habits, sleep, and focused time greatly contribute to this equation.

comics on productivity

2. Design Your Tree of Values

Executives, managers, freelancers, consultants, parents.

We all have to make hundreds of decisions every single day.

Anything from “Where can I find an optimal parking spot” to “How to maximize these 30 minutes before the next meeting” to “Is this prospect aligned with our company culture.

This is unbearable unless you have a strong foundation of values and goals.

Whenever you have to pick between “should I invest an hour in my personal brand for the long-term” or “call 5 more prospects from the list“, you need a predefined framework that holds the answer to this very question.

While this exercise takes a while to complete, it’s a must-do.

Build a comprehensive tree of what truly matters to you. Every day, you will face contradictory questions and deal with more than you can handle. Learning how to cope is all reliant on your prioritization queue which sits right under your tree of values.

  • You always have to pick your kid up from school no matter what. This is an activity that sits on top of your tree.
  • If personal branding is really important to you, make it a priority. Don’t make excuses with the “yet another lead” and just block 45min of your time daily on working on your brand.
  • Is your cooking class really that important? If it truly charges you greatly, then make it a priority. But if it jeopardizes your work and can lead to more serious consequences after, consider if you’d skip classes every time an important request comes in.

These simple examples lead to the core answers. “Family vs. work”, “Time vs. professional development“, “Higher revenue vs. culture development”, “Tons of cash from a political party vs. less stress and no disappointment from certain team members.”

You still need to revise your core framework every 6 months or so. But between your “sanity check” self-meetings, you accept these goals as axioms and base your decisions solely on your foundational paradigm of what you firmly believe in and believe would define you as your best self.

Your energy is your biggest asset

3. Make Time By Blocking Time

“I don’t have time” is the number one excuse for procrastination.

Has anyone been granted more than 168 hours a week?

Making time is a matter of energy management and motivation.

If you are failing to make time for what matters the most to you, then you are either failing to manage your energy effectively or don’t care about this enough.

If surfing is more important than your job, either find a job near the ocean where you can surf (or teach) or find a way to land a remote job that pays “enough” for survival so that surfing is top of mind.

Otherwise, it’s just a hobby that falls under the “nice to have” category. 95% of the population spend up to 55 hours a week on work (and commute included) consistently. Between food, family, and sleep, you can effectively put 20h+ in any activity if that’s truly a priority for you.

4. The Pomodoro Technique

The Pomodoro Technique is a powerful framework for employees who work on long, complex tasks continuously. I tried it for a few months back in my software engineering days when meetings, sales calls, and regular emergencies weren’t all too common.

Here’s how Pomodoro works in practice:

  1. Pick a new task at hand that you need to complete
  2. Set a 25-minute alarm for non-interrupted time to work
  3. After the work sprint, take a 5-minute break
  4. Every 4 pomodoros, take a 20 to 30-minute break before the coming sprint.

There are online apps that let you accomplish that (and even physical Pomodoro clocks that do the counting for you).

As you turn your phone and messengers off and truly focus on the job (being pressed by time), the odds of accomplishing more in less time increase significantly.

5. Getting Things Done

“Getting Things Done” is one of the older productivity methodologies originally announced by David Allen in 2001.

The productivity framework revolves around a number of activities on effective task management, resource allocation, and grouping assignments in an organized manner.

This management technique is organized around five different lists you manage:

  • “In” (brain dump)
  • Next actions (todo)
  • Waiting for (blockers)
  • Projects (larger activities)
  • Some day (future)

Going through the incoming tasks follows a specific workflow in order to organize tasks properly (as seen in D&E’s chart):

GTD is more complex to implement, but if you’re looking for a single system to rule ’em all, investing some time in studying the system can yield awesome benefits.

6. The 1-3-5 List

The 1-3-5 list is one of my favorite techniques that I use when traveling or during the intense events season.

What it boils down to is a daily agenda that includes:

  • 1 priority task to be done “no matter what”
  • 3 doable activities you should do
  • 5 low-effort, quick wins for the day

Instead of cluttering your backlog with everything and anything, pick a few items and assign them for the day. One step at a time with a clear roadmap ahead.

With less than 10 daily tasks to handle, constant interruptions could be prevented with the right preparation. This simplifies your weekly planning as well – delegating low priority requirements and optimizing your management backlog for the coming week will take no longer than 2 hours.

Alex Cavoulacos, the author of The New Rules of Work and a Founder of The Muse, is a proponent of the 1-3-5 method:

For example, when a surprise presentation falls on your lap, try: “Sure, I can get that to you by 3 PM, but the Q1 reports won’t be ready until tomorrow then, since I’d scheduled to work on that today.”

Cavoulacos also advises using your calendar as a to-do list. Completing the highest priority task before lunch can result in a notable motivation and a boost for closing the rest of the tasks before the end of the day.

A stand-alone app named “135 List” is the go-to companion for your smartphone or a browser if you want to dive into the philosophy of the core team.

7. Interruption Science

After crossing off several techniques, let’s focus on what matters: focus itself.

Interruption science is the study of human performance including a myriad of factors affecting productivity.

Especially among office workers and important industry professionals (like doctors or prosecutors), implementing effective techniques with conducting critical activities with limited disruptions may be a life-or-death case.

With the evolution of push notifications, instant messengers, random robocalls, workers often receive over a hundred interruptions throughout the day. And more complex scenarios may require over half an hour in returning back to your focused state.

8. Annual Resolutions

The most popular resolutions out there commence on New Year’s Eve.

During the retrospection of the past year, people all around the world decide to engage in new activities, enroll in a class, purchase a gym membership or simply task themselves to accomplish more than they could handle.

Enforcing reality check and using some of the productivity frameworks reviewed here can help align expectations and deliver more than what you usually do. But aside from the mechanics of the exercise, it’s important to follow some common sense advice as well:

  • Be realistic when defining your list of resolutions
  • Don’t limit your planning to a singular Jan 1st effort
  • Prepare a well-defined plan that reveals the full context of the plan
  • Discuss the plan ahead with friends, colleagues, family
  • Design an effective way to track progress
  • Gamify the experience and reward yourself
  • Establish realistic time frames and reasonable goals
  • Clear out all and any obstacles that could hypothetically get in the way
  • Don’t give up once you’re committed to the challenge
Productivity

9. Don’t Break The Chain

Jerry Seinfeld, the infamous actor and standup comedian, has shared his alternative calendar system that helps him progress – both professionally and personally – one step at a time.

The secret to Seinfeld’s recipe is in projecting the bigger picture and embracing the time it takes to achieve results. Unlike the 1-3-5 method, Don’t Break the Chain relies on a gamified experience whenever there’s a major obstacle to overcome.

For example, you are determined to improve your public speaking skills in order to pitch your new product at TechCrunch Disrupt. There are 6 months to go and tons of fine-tuning ahead. Working on your body language and posture, clear pronunciation, coming up with powerful stories, training your voice are just a small subset of the activities you are about to excel at.

Writing these down into a bloated list of tasks simply won’t work.

Seinfield – being your virtual coach – will hand you a calendar and tick today’s date. Your mission is to go through your draft pitch. Take some notes and mark it down on your calendar.

Repeat the same talk tomorrow, then the day after. Keep accumulating the track record of exercises on a daily basis. It’s all about incremental improvement and practice. Over time, your consecutive list of pitches will serve as a spiritual source forcing you to move forward.

Matt Mullenweg, co-founder of WordPress and the CEO of Automattic, shared his tips when it comes to chores that most people try to avoid at all costs over an interview for Tim Ferriss.

“Just before I got in the shower, I do 1 push-up.”, says Mullenweg. “And no matter how late are you running, no matter what’s going on in the world, you can’t argue against doing one push-up. Like, come on, there is no excuse. So, I often find I just need to like, get over that initial hump, with something that’s almost embarrassingly small.”

Productivity As A Habit

Productivity is a trainable skill

Beginner managers or entrepreneurs often look for workarounds when it comes to squeezing some efficiency on top of their workday.

There are no shortcuts to success. But productivity frameworks and tools can enable you to accomplish more in less time, thus maximizing your time, investing additional energy in the long-term strategy.

More importantly, productivity is a trainable skill. You have to practice it continuously. Refine your processes. Optimize your scheduling chops.

And as your business grows (along with your responsibilities), always keep an eye on new techniques that could come handy at the right time.

What is the most integral productivity hack that you’re living by?

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